Category: Funny Law Friday

4 Countries With Strict Baby Naming Laws

4 Countries With Strict Baby Naming Laws

Naming Laws

Here in the UK you can almost name your baby anything (within reason), but did you know that some countries around the world have laws regarding the naming of new born babies. That’s why this Funny Law Friday we are taking a look at 4 countries with strict and interesting naming laws.

Germany

Germany is a very practical and forward thinking country, this also shows in their baby naming laws. When naming your child in Germany you must be able to tell the gender of the child by their first name, and then the name must also not have a negative effect on the wellbeing of the child. The First name must also not be a last name, an object or a product. The name you choose has to be approved by the Standesamt (German civil registration office). If the office rejects your chosen name you can appeal the decision. But if you lose the appeal a new will have to be chosen. Each time you submit a name you pay a fee, so it can get costly.

Denmark

Denmark have a very strict law in place for personal names. This is to protect children from having odd names. Denmark have a list of 7,000 pre-approved names that parents can choose from. If the parents wish to name their child something that is not on the list. They will have to get special permission from their local church, and the name is then reviewed by governmental officials. Like Germany the law states that the first name must indicate the gender of the child, also the first name must not be a last name. There are also laws in place that to protect rare Danish last names.

Sweden

In Sweden first names must be reported to the Tax Agency for approval. First names will not be approved if they can cause offense or can cause discomfort. it can also be rejected if it is not suitable as a first name. In Sweden you are allowed multiple first names, but if later in life you wish to change your first name you must keep at least one of your original first names. For example, if you were called Matt and you wanted to change your name to Luke, your new name would be Luke Matt. Also you can only change your name once.

Iceland

Iceland have a naming committee which decide whether a given name will be acceptable. If parents wish to choose a name that is not on the National Register of Persons, they must apply for it to be approved. For a name to be approved it must pass a few tests. It must only contain letters in the Icelandic alphabet, and must also fit grammatically with the language. Other points are: it must not embarrass the child in the future, it must be gender specific and no more than 3 personal names are allowed.


This article is intended for general information purposes only and  shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. Newnham &  Jordan Solicitors cannot accept  responsibility for  any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in  respect of this  article or any external articles it may refer or link to.


 

 

Are you fit to drive?

are you fit to drive main blog image

Driving requires a level of skill and the ability to interact with both the vehicle and the external environment. Rule 90, 91, 92, 93 and 94 of The Highway Code states the different factors that can affect a person’s ability to drive safely.

Safe driving requires some of the following:

  • vision
  • visuospatial perception
  • hearing
  • attention and concentration
  • memory
  • insight and understanding
  • judgement
  • adaptive strategies
  • good reaction time
  • planning and organisation
  • ability to self-monitor
  • sensation
  • muscle power and control
  • coordination

 

If a person develops a medical condition that could affect the safety of their driving, they should contact the DVLA as soon as possible. If a driver does not inform the DVLA, they could be fined up to £1,000. The DVLA have listed over 200 medical conditions for which people MAY need to notify them about.

The list below show some examples of conditions in which the DVLA should be informed about:

  • An epileptic event (seizure or fit).
  • Sudden attacks of disabling giddiness, fainting or blackouts.
  • Severe learning disability.
  • A pacemaker or implanted defibrillator device fitted.
  • Diabetes controlled by insulin or tablets that have a high risk of causing hypoglycaemia
  • Parkinson’s disease.
  • Any other chronic neurological condition.
  • Dementia or a serious problem with memory.
  • A major or minor cerebrovascular event (only if there is residual neurological or cognitive deficit one month after the event).
  • Multiple transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs) over a short period but not single TIA.
  • Any type of brain surgery, brain tumour or severe head injury involving inpatient treatment at hospital.
  • Any severe psychiatric illness or mental disorder including acute psychosis, mania and severe depressive illness if there are features which affect risk to drive safely or suicidal thoughts.
  • Continuing/permanent difficulty in the use of arms or legs which affects your ability to control a vehicle.
  • Dependence on or misuse of alcohol, illicit drugs or chemical substances in the previous three years (do not include drink/driving offences).
  • Any visual disability which affects BOTH eyes (do not declare short/long sight or colour blindness).
  • Narcolepsy or other primary hypersomnia.

 

See GOV.UK Health Conditions and Driving for a full list of potentially notifiable conditions.

Rule 90

Make sure that you are fit to drive. You MUST report to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) any health condition likely to affect your driving.

Law RTA 1988 sect 94

Rule 91

Driving when you are tired greatly increases your risk of collision. To minimise this risk

  • make sure you are fit to drive. Do not begin a journey if you are tired. Get a good night’s sleep before embarking on a long journey
  • avoid undertaking long journeys between midnight and 6 am, when natural alertness is at a minimum
  • plan your journey to take sufficient breaks. A minimum break of at least 15 minutes after every two hours of driving is recommended
  • if you feel at all sleepy, stop in a safe place. Do not stop on the hard shoulder of a motorway
  • the most effective ways to counter sleepiness are to drink, for example, two cups of caffeinated coffee and to take a short nap (at least 15 minutes)

Rule 92

Vision. You MUST be able to read a vehicle number plate, in good daylight, from a distance of 20 metres (or 20.5 metres where the old style number plate is used). If you need to wear glasses (or contact lenses) to do this, you MUSTwear them at all times while driving. The police have the power to require a driver to undertake an eyesight test.

Laws RTA 1988 sect 96, & MV(DL)R reg 40 & sched 8

Rule 93

Slow down, and if necessary stop, if you are dazzled by bright sunlight.

Rule 94

At night or in poor visibility, do not use tinted glasses, lenses or visors if they restrict your vision.


This article is intended for general information purposes only and  shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. Newnham &  Jordan Solicitors cannot accept  responsibility for  any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in  respect of this  article or any external articles it may refer or link to.


 

Are you fit to drive?
Belly-dancing snakes and a Parking offence

Belly-dancing snakes and a Parking offence

Belly-dancing snakes and a Parking offence main blog imageThis case is how a woman got out of a parking penalty due to her snakes…

The case: A woman was given a parking penalty for leaving her car outside a building with the engine still running. Her excuse was that she had a car full of snakes, which she was going to be using for her belly-dancing act. The lady didn’t want the snakes to fall asleep in a cold car, so the running engine helped them stay awake so that they would be ready for the performance.

The verdict: The court ruled that she had good reason to leave her engine on, and let the belly-dancing snake charmer walk free.

To see more of our Funny Law Friday’s just like us on Facebook


This article is intended for general information purposes only and  shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. Newnham &  Jordan Solicitors cannot accept  responsibility for  any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in  respect of this  article or any external articles it may refer or link to.


 

Funny Law Friday

IN CALIFORNIA, IT IS ILLEGAL TO EAT AN ORANGE IN YOUR BATHTUB

It was made in the 1920’s, when people believed that the citric acid in the orange would mix with the natural bath oils and would create a highly explosive mixture.


This article is intended for general information purposes only and  shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. Newnham &  Jordan Solicitors cannot accept  responsibility for  any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in  respect of this  article or any external articles it may refer or link to.


Like us on Facebook to see More Funny Law Fridays

Funny Law Friday